Katy Perry's Left Shark trademark applications hit a snag; my commentary on the "Blurred Lines" verdict, in the World IP Review

Posted by Charles Colman

As World IP Review reports, some of Katy Perry's 'Left Shark' trademark applications have hit a snag at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  The TESS entry for one of the applications in question is posted below.  (Oh, and speaking of the World IP Review, you can read my musings on the (fairly) recent jury verdict in the "Blurred Lines" copyright infringement case here.)



Video of AU Law's 2015 "IP/Gender - Mapping the Connections" conference (including my talk on "Patents and Perverts") and more!

Posted by Charles Colman

The 2015 IP/Gender conference at American University's Washington College of Law was a smashing success; the video of the full event is posted here.  I presented "Patents and Perverts" -- now tentatively retitled "Design and Deviance" -- whose abstract is posted on SSRN.  If you're interested in my portion of the conference, if starts at the 5:02 mark.  (As always, Professor Rebecca Tushnet has done a wonderful public service by transcribing the event essentials.)

 

Also, in case you missed the Copyright Society's recent panel on IP-for-fashion (co-hosted with the NYU Law Media Collaborative), a video of that event is posted here.

 

Oh, and did you read this January 26th column on the "utility-design patent boundary" by my firm's Of Counsel, Yin Huang?  If not, you should check that out, too...

Interview for Washington Square News (NYU student newspaper) article, "Fashion, lawsuits an unexpected pair"

Posted by Charles Colman

Washington Square News, NYU's Independent Student Newspaper, has published an article, "Fashion, lawsuits unexpected pair," in its November 5, 2014, issue.  In the piece, staff reporter Sam Del Rowe interviews Barbara Kolsun (Stuart Weitzman GC, NYU adjunct prof, and co-editor (with FIT professor Guillermo Jimenez) of Fashion Law: A Guide for Designers, Fashion Executives, and Attorneys -- to which I contributed a chapter on copyright law) about the current lay of the land.

 

Del Rowe goes on to ask this writer, one Charles Colman, about his views on life, law, and the pursuit of unlawful monopolies.  He selects a portion of my answers to his questions, but -- for anyone who is interested -- I've copied my unedited responses to Del Rowe below (hyperlinks added):